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St Cloud Ln, Boca Raton United States, Florida 33431

Monday
08:00 - 22:00

Tuesday - Wednesday
09:00 - 17:00

Thursday - Sunday
08:00 - 22:00

Write My Essay SOS
Category: Education & Research Foundations

Key contact details for Write My Essay SOS
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217 530-1627
Email
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Website
writemyessaysos.com
writemyessaysos.com/pay-for-homework
Address
St Cloud Ln, Boca Raton United States, Florida 33431

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Business profile

Survivor to Master: The First Year of Teaching
The first year of teaching can be a roller coaster. Here are some tips to help you become a master teacher--not just a surviving teacher.Dr. Steve Perry is fond of saying, "Teachers teach not for a living, but for a loving." This is one of the first things that new teachers learn--not just that teaching is hard, but that it's so much more than a "job." To master teaching, you must truly love what you do.
Here are some other key tips for not only surviving your first year of teaching but beginning to master the calling:

Structure your classroom. Have rules, procedures, and policies in place before the students even walk in on the first day. The first class is crucial in setting the tone for the year. The more structured your class, the fewer disruptions you'll encounter.

Find a mentor. No teacher can do it alone. Find a mentor (ideally a more experienced fellow teacher) with whom you can share your challenges.

Plan, plan, plan. Plan your units well ahead of time so you have a good idea of where you're going and how you're going to get there. Develop assessments, activities, and daily lessons before you start teaching the unit. This is called "backward-design."

Set high expectations. Just because you're a first-year teacher doesn't mean that your students aren't capable of great things. Set the bar high and show them how to meet (or even exceed) your expectations.

Learn more. All teachers, new and old, should be life-long learners. Continue to research innovative ways of teaching so that you can stay on top of your practice and your discipline.

Reach out to families. Families can be your biggest allies in the classroom. Try to call home before the school year starts and during the first few weeks of school. Stay positive during these calls. This way, later in the year, if you need to give constructive criticism for a student, the parent(s) will be more receptive to your concerns. Continue to call home about positive news throughout the year. Too many parents are accustomed to receiving only negative calls from teachers.

Leave time for you, your family, and your friends. Because teaching can be consuming, it's easy for teachers to forget other parts of their lives, especially during their first year. Maintain a balance between school and home.

Reflect. Keep a journal. Write down what went well and what didn't. Continue to reflect on your practice, either for cathartic or professional purposes (or both).

  • Business profile

    Survivor to Master: The First Year of Teaching
    The first year of teaching can be a roller coaster. Here are some tips to help you become a master teacher--not just a surviving teacher.Dr. Steve Perry is fond of saying, "Teachers teach not for a living, but for a loving." This is one of the first things that new teachers learn--not just that teaching is hard, but that it's so much more than a "job." To master teaching, you must truly love what you do.
    Here are some other key tips for not only surviving your first year of teaching but beginning to master the calling:

    Structure your classroom. Have rules, procedures, and policies in place before the students even walk in on the first day. The first class is crucial in setting the tone for the year. The more structured your class, the fewer disruptions you'll encounter.

    Find a mentor. No teacher can do it alone. Find a mentor (ideally a more experienced fellow teacher) with whom you can share your challenges.

    Plan, plan, plan. Plan your units well ahead of time so you have a good idea of where you're going and how you're going to get there. Develop assessments, activities, and daily lessons before you start teaching the unit. This is called "backward-design."

    Set high expectations. Just because you're a first-year teacher doesn't mean that your students aren't capable of great things. Set the bar high and show them how to meet (or even exceed) your expectations.

    Learn more. All teachers, new and old, should be life-long learners. Continue to research innovative ways of teaching so that you can stay on top of your practice and your discipline.

    Reach out to families. Families can be your biggest allies in the classroom. Try to call home before the school year starts and during the first few weeks of school. Stay positive during these calls. This way, later in the year, if you need to give constructive criticism for a student, the parent(s) will be more receptive to your concerns. Continue to call home about positive news throughout the year. Too many parents are accustomed to receiving only negative calls from teachers.

    Leave time for you, your family, and your friends. Because teaching can be consuming, it's easy for teachers to forget other parts of their lives, especially during their first year. Maintain a balance between school and home.

    Reflect. Keep a journal. Write down what went well and what didn't. Continue to reflect on your practice, either for cathartic or professional purposes (or both).

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